Monday, October 15, 2018

Casefile Research: Emerent Fouche (Freed Slave)

Casefile on Emerent Fouche
Before I started my research, I picked a freed slave casefile on Emerent Fouche. I picked Emerent’s file because I wanted to know what life was like for her after she became a freed slave. I wanted to know if she got married, had children, and when she died.
            In the Louisiana Freed Slave records, I found Emerent’s file that I already had on her. The file showed that Emerent was a mulatto and had a white father named Etienne Fouche, who was also her master, and a black mother named Marguerite, a slave. This file also shares that Emerent was only two years old in August 18, 1808 when she became a freed slave. The reason why Fouche became a freed slave is because she was baptized. Emerent was able to get baptized because her father Etienne was a part of the Manumission Process.
            In Quebec, Canada, Vital and Church Records (1621-1968), I found a record that might be about Etienne Fouche. The file shows that Etienne was baptized, which makes me believe that this might be about Etienne because Emerent was also baptized. I believe this file could be about Etienne because Emerent’s file shows that she was baptized, so that means Etienne was probably baptized when he was a child. The information I found on this file shows that Etienne was baptized in Pointe-aux-Trembles, Quebec and his place of worship was St-Enfant-Jesus-de-la-Pointe-aux- Trembles. A casefile could have helped me find out if this is Emerent’s father.
In the Louisiana, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index (1791-1890), I found a file that might be about Etienne Fouche, Emerent’s father.  This file could be significant because the information on this showed that person was from Louisiana and living around the time Etienne was alive.
In the 1810 United States Federal Census, I searched for Emerent’s father but found a file that might be about Emerent. It might be about Emerent because this file is about a slave. This file shows that the person was living in Louisiana in 1810. Next, the file showed that there was one freed slave, two that are slaves and three people living in the same household. This file shows that this could be Emerent because in 1810 Emerent was a freed slave and her mother and her other child were still slaves.
When I looked up Etienne Fouche, I found two census records that I thought could be about him. In the Louisiana Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, (1791-1890), I found a file that could be about Etienne because this person was living in Louisiana in 1810 which is the same time Etienne was alive. In the 1810 United States Federal Census, I found a file that could be about Emerent. This file could be about Emerent because this person was living in Louisiana, had one freed person two that were still slaves, and three household members.
            In the Louisiana, Freed Slave records, I looked up Marguerite, Emerent’s mother, and found a file on Marguerite. The file shows that Marguerite was born in 1778, was thirty years old when she was freed in November 18, 1808, which happened a few months after Emerent was freed. Also, I found out the name of Emerent’s brother in Marguerite file, which is Jean Baptiste Fouche.  In the 1810 United States Federal Census records, I thought there might be a file about Emerent, but it’s not her because Marguerite’s file proves that Emerent, her mom and brother were freed slaves before 1810.
            After I found out the name of Emerent’s brother, I searched for Jean Baptiste Fouche files on the Louisiana, Freed Slave records and was able to find one file on him. In this file, I found out that Baptiste file was similar to Emerent’s file because they both had the same experience and the same parents. In August 18, 1808, I found out that Jean was baptized and freed at the same time as Emerent. The file was the same as Emerent’s because they both were freed on August 18, 1808. Second, Jean and Emerent had the same reason for being freed because they both got baptized. Thirdly, Jean and Emerent had the same file because they both had a white father, Etienne, who was their master and Marguerite was listed as their mother.
            During the time Emerent and her family were still living, there were cotton crops that took over the south side of America. Cotton crops took over the south side of America because the cotton gin helped farmers harvest a lot of cotton. Farmers were able to harvest a lot of cotton crops because they had slaves making cotton by using the cotton gin. Emerent and her family were probably still alive when four million enslaved African Americans lived in the south side. The four million slaves were mostly toiling on plantations sixteen hours a day, pruning, watering and harvesting cotton.
            After Emerent became a freed slave, she was able to live her life without being treated as property. Emerent was able to avoid being treated as property because she did not have to make cotton from a cotton gin like slaves that were not freed. If Etienne was not a part of the manumission process, Emerent, her mom and her brother wouldn’t have become freed slaves during the early 1800’s. Emerent might have been separated from Etienne because Marguerite probably took Emerent and Jean somewhere up north since there were no records on the Louisiana Record that showed if Emerent and Jean lived in there in their adult years.




            The file “Emerent Fouche” by Ancestry shows how Emerent became a freed slave because during the 1800’s she was able to become a freed slave due to baptism. Also, the file “Marguerite” by Ancestry informs that Emerent her mother and her brother were all freed in 1808. The article “Cotton in the Deep South” by Ancestry informs that Emerent and her family were alive at the same time that there was cotton crops all over the south side of America because cotton crops were bringing in a lot of money.







References
Ancestry.com. “Cotton in the Deep South.” 2018, https://www.ancestry.com/contextux/historicalinsights/cotton-south-1800s/persons/202038495169:1030:154447662.
Ancestry.com. “Quebec, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1968.” Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2008.
Hall, Gwendolyn Midlo, comp, “Louisiana, Freed Slave Records, 1719-182